A Photoshoot Of Style

As a small town librarian there is plenty of time for personal projects. I chose recently to document what I was wearing as I enjoyed the look.

As the day was cold I chose the thickest, longest socks from my collection. I also choose the leather Reeboks as they are the best for walking and running in.

My skirt is a lovely purple, 100% wool, pleated affair from Pendleton. I got it at the thrift store. (I live in a lovely neighborhood for thrift stores.) I noticed the fabric first, then the length and style. Upon discovering that it would fit me I bought it. Only then did I realize that it was purple and I, therefore, didn’t have to worry about trying to get more purple into my wardrobe.

The books are Inheritance by Christopher Paolini, Anne of Green Gables by LM Montgomery, and New Chronicles of Rebecca by Kate Douglas Wiggin. I’ve read them all and enjoyed them to varying degrees.

Lastly, I know nothing about the shirt, other than the fact that it is a maroon basic. The purple hair ribbon is a satin strip that I picked up somewhere.

There you have it. Do I look like a librarian? Should I go through and remove all the k’s because my eyboard is acting up and not letting me get it on the first hit?

 

How To Make A Silk Tie Skirt

And What I Wouldn’t Suggest Doing

  1. Visit all the local thrift stores and search for ties that have similar colors, or simply choose ties that you like the look of. Look for ties that say 100% silk or all silk. Look around, some stores may have larger selections for cheaper.
  2. Calculate how many ties you will need at minimum and get nearly twice as many. *Ok this is not strictly necessary, but it isn’t a bad idea. Later you may notice holes, fall out of love with a pattern, or decide the fabric is thicker than you want*
  3. Take the ties apart by removing labels and pulling out the back seam. *This step can be skipped if you are going for a quick, but heavy skirt.*

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    A heap of tie innards
  4. Optional sew the labels back on.
  5. Wash the ties. They won’t fray because the are bias cut.

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    The ties after ironing being stored in the bag they came from the store in
  6. Iron the ties
  7. Decide which ties you want in your skirt. *If you decide on a certain order either take a picture of the setup or number the ties with masking tape*
  8. Decide how long you want your skirt to be and cut the ties. *finished wide end will be the hem of your skirt*
  9. Sew the ties together.
  10. Sew the final seam and add the zipper.DSC_0266
  11. Sew on the waistband by hand for a perfect finish

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A Silk Tie Skirt Part 1

When my blog was much newer than it is now I started a project. I called it my Secret Project or something like that.

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The Ties

I was making a silk skirt from ties. I took apart the ties. Moved their tags. Washed them. And got most of the major seams sewn.

Then… I quit…

I didn’t want to put the zipper in. So I put it aside and moved on.

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Recently with M’s Best Friend’s wedding coming up. I thought it would be fun if I could finish the skirt and maybe make a similar top from the scraps and ties I didn’t use.

So I put in the zipper and decided to use the thick golden tie for the waist.

It has been going remarkably well. This is the first time I have sewn with silk and the first time I have done much sewing with bias cut fabric. It is easier than I feared. The bias cut gets rid of the fraying silk is famous for. And silk isn’t as scary to sew as people made it seem.

A Heart Pocket History,

Back in 2014 Mom made me a skirt. She used upside-down huge blue jean legs for the main part and a pair of darker blue pockets for pockets. To make the skirt longer and prettier she added a pink ruffle to the bottom and matching pink hearts on the pockets.

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At P’s graduation, just after it was made

I loved it. I wore it all the time, so naturally the ruffle wore away super quickly.

Thankfully the rest of the skirt was still good, so it was a matter of a few minutes to change out the ruffle. This time I cut up a skirt I had made years before in a sewing class. It was a lovely ruffle.

Second-rendition-of heart-pockets
Pardon the ugly face. At a family reunion, after falling in a river.

This ruffle lasted longer, but the day came that it could no longer serve. Unfortunately I have no pictures of what happened next to this skirt. I was wearing it one day when someone mentioned I had a whole in my skirt. I was expecting it (I had been wearing the skirt year round for four years), so sad as I was I retired the body of my skirt.

The pockets were still good though as was the ruffle so I made a new skirt body and put them onto it.

Final-heart-pockets
Tada!!!

Sadly though now one of my pockets has a hole in the bottom, so when this wears out I will only have pictures and scraps. I love this skirt and I’m glad that I put reminders of it on my blog. It’s been a staple for a long time.