A Swimsuit And A Throwback

You may remember back at the beginning of summer I made a swimsuit. I promised to come back at the end of summer and review. I wanted to review it earlier, but I kept not getting pictures. I still don’t have pictures of me wearing it, but I’ve finally got a nice flat lay. So pictures of it worn may be coming, but for now..

The Fit

Lets be honest I made it myself, so of course it fits well.

The Built In Bra

No that doesn’t go under fit, but it works perfectly. I’m so glad I decided to use my fabric scraps for it.

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The Swimability

Can I swim in it. Yes, really well.

The Green Factor

The only new material that went into the swimsuit was the thread. The main fabric is rayon, but there is some rubber in the elastic. And the zipper is plastic.

close-up-on-zipper

The Style Factor

You might not be able to tell, but I think it looks super cool. A slight 1920’s inspiration, with an asymmetric hem.

Honestly I’m super happy with it. I’ve never even considered making a swimsuit before and now I’ve made one.

Here is a random picture of the sunrise I got this morning when I went out to get the rest of these pics.

sunrise

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How To Make SciFi Sleeves

If you don’t like sleeveless things then almost undoubtedly if you modify your clothes you have at least tried to add sleeves to something. Allow me to let everyone who doesn’t in on a little secret. Sleeves are the worst. I’ve seen them called Sleevils. Putting in a classic, smooth sleeve is torture. Gathered sleeves are slightly better, but they still come with a myriad of fitting possibilities.

So today I’m going to talk about the easiest type of sleeve to do. No gathering and the bias stretch has no effect. I’m talking about sci-fi sleeves. Now unfortunately I don’t have a good picture of them, because my family thinks that they look a little silly.

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Take a square of fabric that has a diagonal length that is the almost* same as around your armhole.

Cut the fabric on the diagonal.

Hem the four short sides. If the diagonal is not a bias cut zigzag its edge.

Now you have two sleeves, all ready to go into your shirt. Yay!!!

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An extremely fuzzy picture that shows the finished side view.

Mark the center of the long side with a pin.

If you are making the shirt from scratch: put the pin in the shoulder seam right sides together.

If you are putting the sleeves into a pre-finished shirt: put the pin in the shoulder seam with the right side of the sleeve facing the wrong side of the shirt.

Then pin and sew the sleeve on with your preferred method. (when I use pins I tend to put them well in the seam allowance so I can sew around them)

Make sure all threads are knotted and clipped. Iron it if necessary.

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I call it a SciFi sleeve because it give a silhouette like this.
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It is a little hard to tell, but you can see the sleeve sticking out in this picture.

*The exact length doesn’t matter to much as some overlap at the bottom of the armhole is fine as is a small gap.

 

How To Make A Silk Tie Skirt

And What I Wouldn’t Suggest Doing

  1. Visit all the local thrift stores and search for ties that have similar colors, or simply choose ties that you like the look of. Look for ties that say 100% silk or all silk. Look around, some stores may have larger selections for cheaper.
  2. Calculate how many ties you will need at minimum and get nearly twice as many. *Ok this is not strictly necessary, but it isn’t a bad idea. Later you may notice holes, fall out of love with a pattern, or decide the fabric is thicker than you want*
  3. Take the ties apart by removing labels and pulling out the back seam. *This step can be skipped if you are going for a quick, but heavy skirt.*

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    A heap of tie innards
  4. Optional sew the labels back on.
  5. Wash the ties. They won’t fray because the are bias cut.

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    The ties after ironing being stored in the bag they came from the store in
  6. Iron the ties
  7. Decide which ties you want in your skirt. *If you decide on a certain order either take a picture of the setup or number the ties with masking tape*
  8. Decide how long you want your skirt to be and cut the ties. *finished wide end will be the hem of your skirt*
  9. Sew the ties together.
  10. Sew the final seam and add the zipper.DSC_0266
  11. Sew on the waistband by hand for a perfect finish

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A Silk Tie Skirt Part 1

When my blog was much newer than it is now I started a project. I called it my Secret Project or something like that.

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The Ties

I was making a silk skirt from ties. I took apart the ties. Moved their tags. Washed them. And got most of the major seams sewn.

Then… I quit…

I didn’t want to put the zipper in. So I put it aside and moved on.

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Recently with M’s Best Friend’s wedding coming up. I thought it would be fun if I could finish the skirt and maybe make a similar top from the scraps and ties I didn’t use.

So I put in the zipper and decided to use the thick golden tie for the waist.

It has been going remarkably well. This is the first time I have sewn with silk and the first time I have done much sewing with bias cut fabric. It is easier than I feared. The bias cut gets rid of the fraying silk is famous for. And silk isn’t as scary to sew as people made it seem.

A Heart Pocket History,

Back in 2014 Mom made me a skirt. She used upside-down huge blue jean legs for the main part and a pair of darker blue pockets for pockets. To make the skirt longer and prettier she added a pink ruffle to the bottom and matching pink hearts on the pockets.

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At P’s graduation, just after it was made

I loved it. I wore it all the time, so naturally the ruffle wore away super quickly.

Thankfully the rest of the skirt was still good, so it was a matter of a few minutes to change out the ruffle. This time I cut up a skirt I had made years before in a sewing class. It was a lovely ruffle.

Second-rendition-of heart-pockets
Pardon the ugly face. At a family reunion, after falling in a river.

This ruffle lasted longer, but the day came that it could no longer serve. Unfortunately I have no pictures of what happened next to this skirt. I was wearing it one day when someone mentioned I had a whole in my skirt. I was expecting it (I had been wearing the skirt year round for four years), so sad as I was I retired the body of my skirt.

The pockets were still good though as was the ruffle so I made a new skirt body and put them onto it.

Final-heart-pockets
Tada!!!

Sadly though now one of my pockets has a hole in the bottom, so when this wears out I will only have pictures and scraps. I love this skirt and I’m glad that I put reminders of it on my blog. It’s been a staple for a long time.

The Families of Clothes

As I get closer to finally being able to start selling my handmade clothes, I am reminded that A suggested that I have more than just basic descriptions. She suggested that I write about who would wear them and tell stories about their past.

So I’ve been at work coming up with “families” for the different types of clothes. I want to make it so you can tell what it is by its name.

So far I have Princess Shorts.

I also have Sister Skirts.

There will be Everyday Elegance Dresses.

I’m pondering using the phrase “it’s a split” for culottes, split skirts, and pants.

I suppose I could use Basic Blice for the shirts. Sorry for the awful language joke.

And if all else fails Mister E Man’s might work.

All this really says is. My cold is mostly gone, so I don’t feel bad about sewing. Most of the fuss that goes into getting a Etsy account is out of the way. I love backstories and I also enjoy puns.

I’m looking forward to starting the Etsy shop, I will sell only things made from found fabrics on there. I hope to earn at least enough money for my best friend and I to be able to visit Israel.

An Upcycled Skirt

Sorry no before pictures. But you can guess.

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I started with two skirts: a black one that had no pockets and was to big and a blue one that was to short.

I cut the hem off the blue one and took the waistband off the black one and sewed them together.

And then my family said “It looks like you sewed two skirts together.”

So I added pockets!

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I cut the waist band into lovely back jean pocket shapes, sewed on white ribbon to mimic the design on the skirt, and ta da awesome new four pocketed skirt. Yay!

This is an example of a detail picture like we’ll do for the shop.